An overview of machiavellis view of human nature in the prince

In order for a political theory to function in a certain society, it needs to understand how people think and act. To sum up, prowess is to be preferred over fortune because prowess leads to a more effective ruler who is likely to garner lasting glory.

Instead, he turns to the individual?

machiavelli view on citizens

These interests were gaining, maintaining, and expanding his political power. Ultimately, if your view of human nature is fearsome and unlovable, you are bound by honesty to advise that "it's much safer to be feared than loved".

Machiavelli on human nature pdf

Every action the prince takes must be considered in light of its effect on the state, not in terms of its intrinsic moral value. Ambition lies among those who have achieved some power, but most common people are satisfied with the way things are and therefore do not yearn to improve on the status quo. The fourth way is constitutional, meaning through the official support of either nobles or common people. The dedication declares Machiavelli's intention to discuss in plain language the conduct of great men and the principles of princely government. Although Machiavelli doubted that this form of government could ever be established it did appear several years after he wrote The Prince. The second is through fortune, meaning good luck or the charity of friends. This suggestion once again to serve the Prince's best interests. His opinion was that Italy required a leader who could have complete control over Italy's citizens and institutions. They remain content and happy so long they avoid affliction or oppression. People will naturally feel obligated after receiving a favor or service, and this bond is usually not broken capriciously. Erasmus shares this elitist and negative view of human nature. Because the maintenance of rule is most important to Machiavelli, he concludes that prowess is a better route to become a prince. People are generally self-interested, although their affections for others can be won and lost. His view was free will of the masses can be controlled two ways. Comparing humans with animals was an ancient custom, the virtues of strength, cunning, hard-work or even self-sacrifice being apparently evident in nature and eminently worthy of human contemplation.

All in all, human nature offers little to inspire. However, Machiavelli never advocates cruelty or other vices for their own sake.

machiavelli discourses human nature

It was the main attraction for the renaissance's influences. Much of The Prince is devoted to describing exactly what it means to conduct a good war: how to effectively fortify a city, how to treat subjects in newly acquired territories, and how to prevent domestic insurrection that would distract from a successful war.

They admire honor, generosity, courage, and piety in others, but most do not harbor these virtues.

What was machiavellis view of human nature answer

Cruelty and other vices should not be pursued for their own sake, just as virtue should not be pursued for its own sake: virtues and vices should be conceived as means to an end. His views were to the benefit of the prince, in helping him maintain power rather than to serve to the well being of the citizens. In order for a political theory to function in a certain society, it needs to understand how people think and act. While Machiavelli backs up his political arguments with concrete historical evidence, his statements about society and human nature sometimes have the character of assumptions rather than observations. Machiavelli warns princes against doing things that might result in hatred, such as the confiscation of property or the dissolution of traditional institutions. Machiavelli believes the ruling Prince should be the only authority that should determine every aspect of the state and put in effect a policy which would serve his best interests. And free will of the masses was the reasons that empires fell so free will of the masses must be controlled. Below are various themes outlined in the text. He felt that his suggestions would provide a frame work for a future prince of Italy to bring about political stability. People are generally self-interested, although their affection for others can be won and lost. Constitutional princes are preferable to criminal princes not only because they are more effective, but also because a criminal prince can achieve nothing other than power. Here, the main point of difference is not the skill and experience of the prince but popular attitudes toward the prince. People will naturally feel obligated after receiving a favor or service, and this bond is usually not broken capriciously. It is not necessary for him to be loved; in fact, it is often better for him to be feared. Can historical events be shaped by individuals, or are they the consequences of fortune and circumstance?

The prince plays one of the most important role in the dramatic developing of political in the Renaissance period and still hold an universal impact on today's politicians. Human Nature Machiavelli asserts that a number of traits are inherent in human nature.

Machiavelli quotes on human nature

Their views on human nature and government had some common points and some ideas that differed. Indeed, Machiavelli states several times that when it is in the interests of the state, a prince must strive to act virtuously. Machiavelli does something slightly different, however, by talking in broad terms about human and animal nature, and arguing that the wise leader will "draw on both natures". They remain content and happy so long they avoid affliction or oppression. Also, the masses should fear you not love you. However its views points has been debating over time. All in all, human nature offers little to inspire. Indeed, only when he is absolutely sure that the people who hate him will never be able to rise against him can a prince cease to worry about incurring the hatred of any of his subjects. In what ways do the arguments and examples of the Prince reflect that context?

He strongly promoted a secular society and felt morality was not necessary but stood in the way of a successfully governed state How does Machiavelli view human nature?

His views were to the benefit of the prince, in helping him maintain power rather than to serve to the well being of the citizens.

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How Does Machiavelli View Human Nature